This Is the Bread That I Made for Communion

communion-bread

This is the bread I made for communion. <font size=
Milk and Honey Communion BreadThese are the hands that kneaded the bread that I made for communion.

This is the yeast that raised the bread that I kneaded and made for communion.

Milk and Honey Communion BreadThis is the honey that wakened the yeast that raised the bread that I kneaded and made for communion.

This is the milk that combined with the honey that wakened the yeast that raised the bread that I kneaded and made for communion.

This is the flour, all powdered and white that formed the gluten when combined with the milk that mixed with the honey that wakened the yeast that raised the bread that I kneaded and made for communion.

Milk and Honey Communion BreadThis is the oil, golden and pure that anointed the flour all powdered and white that formed the gluten when combined with the milk that mixed with the honey that wakened the yeast that raised the bread that I kneaded and made for communion.

Milk and Honey Communion BreadThis is the salt, briny and sharp that seasoned the oil, golden and pure that anointed the flour all powdered and white that formed the gluten when combined with the milk that mixed with the honey that wakened the yeast that raised the bread that I kneaded and made for communion.

Milk and Honey Communion BreadThis is the stone, all seasoned and worn that supported the salt, briny and sharp that seasoned the oil, golden and pure that anointed the flour all powdered and white that formed the gluten when combined with the milk that mixed with the honey that wakened the yeast that raised the bread that I kneaded and made for communion.

Milk and Honey Communion BreadThis is the oven, warm and waiting, that heated the stone all seasoned and worn that supported the salt, briny and sharp that seasoned the oil, golden and pure that anointed the flour all powdered and white that formed the gluten when combined with the milk that mixed with the honey that wakened the yeast that raised the bread that I kneaded and made for communion.

St Andrews Presbyterian ChurchThis is the church that receives the bread from the oven, warm and waiting that heated the stone all seasoned and worn that supported the salt, briny and sharp that seasoned the oil, golden and pure that anointed the flour all powdered and white that formed the gluten when combined with the milk that mixed with the honey that wakened the yeast that raised the bread that I kneaded and made for communion.

Nadine Ellsworth-MoranThis is my friend whose flock is the church that receives the bread from the oven, warm and waiting that heated the stone all seasoned and worn that supported the salt, briny and sharp that seasoned the oil, golden and pure that anointed the flour all powdered and white that formed the gluten when combined with the milk that mixed with the honey that wakened the yeast that raised the bread that I kneaded and made for communion.

Milk and Honey Communion BreadThis is the bread that I made for communion.

Milk and Honey Communion Bread
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Recipe type: Bread
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
A chewy, slightly sweet, mild bread for communion–or make it as loaves for toasting or for sandwiches. This makes 2 large loaves. I shaped it into 2 one-pound rounds for communion and one 1½ pound round for us to eat here at home.
What You Need
  • 20 oz whole milk
  • 2 oz unsalted butter
  • 1 package active dry yeast
  • 32 oz bread flour
  • ⅓ cup honey
  • 2½ teaspoons fine sea salt
What To Do
  1. Heat the milk and butter until very warm. Stir until butter is melted and cool (if necessary) to about 130F.
  2. Add the yeast to the mixer bowl.
  3. Pour in all the flour followed by the honey and the salt.
  4. Pour the milk/butter mixture over all.
  5. Fit the mixer with the dough hook and bring the dough together on low speed.
  6. Increase the speed to medium and knead for 8 minutes (you can also do this by hand. It will take about 10-15 minutes. When ready, the dough will be very supple and extensible.
  7. Gather the dough into a nice round and put back in the mixer bowl. Brush on olive oil to thinly cover the exposed dough. Cover and let rise in a warm place until double in size, about two hours.
  8. Press the gases out of the dough and scale 2 pieces of dough at 17 oz (this will yield 1 pound rounds after baking). (You can also scale 3 pieces of dough at 17 oz and still have enough left over to make a couple of small rolls).
  9. Round each piece of dough and place on a well-seasoned stone or a parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush the exposed surfaces with oil. You can cut decorative slits in the dough if you’d like. Your choice.
  10. Cover and let rise until almost doubled again, about an hour.
  11. Bake at 375F for about 30-35 minutes, until deeply golden brown and the internal temperature of the bread reaches 200F.
  12. Let cool on racks completely before slicing.
Other Stuff to Know
You can make 2 loaves out of this dough quite easily. You can also use it to make hamburger buns–they would be wonderful. Scale them at 4 ounces or so. This would also make a lovely braided loaf, so don’t limit yourself.

 

Fun Fact: I found that bread recipe through a search for Milk and Honey Bread, and lo and behold, it is the lovely Kristen Wogan Doyle’s recipe. She wrote it in her pre-Dine&Dish days. How fun is that? Thanks, Kristen!

Thank you for reading, and have a wonderful day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Comments

  1. says

    This is wonderful! So cool that this recipe came from Kristen, way back when! This one’s going in my repertoire when I need a mild, utilitarian loaf.

  2. says

    That may have been one of the best baking posts I have read in a long time. Because we are both mutual besties with KimBee and now that she is coming to FL, I realized it was time to come out of my lurker mode and comment so we can be friends, too, at FBF. I have watched just about all of your hangouts and love your mad baking skills and all of your sweet cats!

  3. Nadine says

    Hoorah!! This is the friend who pastors the flock who can hardly wait to taste the bread that was so lovingly made for communion!! Thank you dear friend!!

  4. Betty Ann @Mango_Queen says

    What a beautiful loaf from an amazing friend! Yes, I’m looking at you, Jenni. Thanks for the step by step photo tutorial. You made it look so easy! Now slice me a piece right now, please :-)

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