Candy Canes for Connecticut

Thursday night I went to bed fully intending to make pulled sugar candy canes on Friday. I got up Friday morning fully intending to make pulled sugar candy canes. And then I heard the news. Twenty babies and six adults killed at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut.

I’ve taught before. I’ve been in a school that has been on lock-down before. I’ve been the teacher trying to calm little kids during scary situations.

I didn’t make pulled sugar candy canes on Friday. On Friday, I cried. I grieved. I was silent.

I remember a poignant article written in The Onion, of all places. After September 11, 2001. Their first issue after moving their base of operations to New York City from Wisconsin. Their whole issue focused on different aspects of the horror of that day.  And one article spoke right to my heart, because I am a baker. On Saturday, I felt just like Christina Pearson of Topeka Kansas, baking an American Flag Cake because she didn’t know what else to do.

On Saturday, I got up and made pulled sugar candy canes. Twenty small candy canes for twenty small children. One larger candy cane to represent the adults.

Today, many bloggers all over the world are observing a Day of Silence, a time for pulling back and reflecting. Today, I will not be silent. Today, I will share my candy canes for Connecticut with you. I will share the names of the children. I will share the names of the adults. I will probably cry some more.

But I don’t know what else to do.

In Memoriam

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Charlotte Bacon, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Daniel Barden, aged 7

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Olivia Engel, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Josephine Gay, aged 7

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Ana Marquez-Greene, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Dylan Hockley, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Madeleine Hsu, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Catherine Hubbard, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Chase Kowalski, aged 7

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Jesse Lewis, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

James Mattioli, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Grace McDonnell, aged 7

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Emilie Parker, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Jack Pinto, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Noah Pozner, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Caroline Previdi, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Jessica Rekos, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Avielle Richman, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Benjamin Wheeler, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Allison Wyatt, aged 6

 

Candy Canes for Connecticut

Rachel Davino–29, Dawn Hochsprung–47, Ann Marie Murphy–52, Lauren Rousseau–30, Mary Sherlach–56, Victoria Soto–27
and Nancy Lanza, killed at her home–52

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Comments

  1. says

    Oh, Chef, I am sitting here with a big ol lump in my throat and tears in my eyes. I have cried and cried and my heart is just broken into a million tiny pieces. I have a son, a high school senior, and I cannot tell you how scary it was to send him to school today. I cannot tell you how I have sat on the edge of my seat every single time I hear a siren going by today. It’s an awful and disgusting feeling deep down in the pit of my stomach and my only selfish hope is that my faith is restored so that it can go away.
    Those parents will never be able to hug or kiss their child again, or tuck them into bed at night. They’ll never get to see them grow up and become adults, and maybe have children of their own. Those children were taken way too soon and their parents were robbed of something so special that I cannot even describe it. I am so, so sorry for them. I hope that they can find peace within and move forward.
    I made sure that I told my son that I loved him, extra times as he left this morning. I hope all of us parents did that.

    • says

      I can only imagine what all parents went through today as they sent their babies off to school. And how the parents in Newtown felt when they had one fewer child to send. I fervently hope for peace and healing for all, @facebook-1276639486:disqus .

  2. Angelika says

    I just read the lovely comment you posted about Noah’s candy cane on the Farine blog. You’re so sweet! I cried and cried, myself, then I got up on Saturday, baked an enormous Red Velvet, and sent it off to work with my husband. It felt ridiculous, but I was trying to comfort myself through the process, I guess, and perhaps by comforting others with a cake (that I cannot eat because of grain allergies!). There is nothing I can do to fill those empty arms or cradle the broken hearts in peace, no matter how I wish I could. So, I bake cakes and cry and pray and hope, and I raise my kids to be good people.

  3. Lesley says

    thank you Jenni..so special. such wonderful things you do! For us, for these wonderful people now gone. Such love put into each piece!

  4. says

    Thank you for doing the menorah for Noah. :-) I know about Noah in particular because he has a twin sister, who survived because she was in a different class. My heart ached for those children, adults and their families before, but when I found out that Noah was a twin, I really lost it. I’m going to donate to the local United Way and/or the local mental health services there, but there is something particularly healing about *physically* doing something to honor them. The candy canes were a beautiful way to do it.

    • says

      Oh, I can’t even imagine how close to home this hits for you being the mother of twins, Jenny! So very tragic. I think it is wonderful that you’ll be donating toward much needed mental health services.

  5. says

    Thank you for honoring the wee ones in such a beautiful way. I’ve been so lost, silent. It’s a sad day when you have to tell your four year old what happened and what to do if bad people come into school with guns.

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