PMAT Live! Episode 16: Pastry Questions Answered

At long, long (loooong) last, here’s the latest episode of PMAT Live! After putting it up, I realized that I had left out the part where I show how to make a pastry bag. I’ll put that up later today. Sorry to Tracey from Tangled Noodle for being slacker than usual. Anyway, I hope to make this an occasional series, so if you have any questions you’d like answered or you’d like a video to show, rather than tell, you how to perform a particular technique, ask away in the comments. Thanks, and enjoy!

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  1. says

    You are so cute and brave! I am terrified of cameras. I was offered a job on TV and just the thought of it makes me uneasy. I’m gonna watch each one of your videos when I get some free time. Happy Thursday! xo

    • says

      Thanks, Yuri! I would watch you on TV. Sometimes, even though it’s just me and my Sanyo, I find myself staring into that unblinking eye and getting sucked into it. :lol:

      I hope you enjoy the videos–I think they’re pretty informative, and I get to wear my keen chef duds!

  2. Lindabee25 says

    Thank you soooooo much for your bread making technique video. I was getting frustrated at my attempts and learned the stretching trick.really helpful. In your oatmeal bread recipe I was wondering how the yeast is activated if the oatmeal is cooled to a jello like state and no other water is in the recipe. I am excited to try it;it looked so good. may I use whole wheat flour? Also does the stretching tec. Apply to whole wheat also.

    • says

       I am so happy that you found the video helpful! Yay!  As to activating the yeast, as long as it gets wet–and the moisture in the oatmeal is enough to do that, all it really needs is time to do its thing.  If you want to shorten the process, by all means bloom it in maybe 1/4 cup of warm water with a pinch of sugar to get it going. You will probably have to add a bit more flour to compensate, but this bread is all about feel, so once your dough is “dough-ish,” you should be fine:)  The windowpane test works for most types of breads although the bran in whole wheat and other whole grain doughs tends to cut the gluten strands, making it not quite as extensible. The dough quite possibly will tear when you do the windowpane/stretch test.  In that case, I find it grab part of the dough and then just pull it away from the rest of it. If it’s stretchy and springs back when you let go (within reason), you should be fine.  If it tears raggedly before you really get a chance to stretch it, it needs more time. Hope that helps!

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