Sunday Suppers: Thufferin' Thuccotash, PMAT Style

Not your run of the mill anemic succotash.  With grudging apology to folks who like the anemic kind.

Not your run of the mill anemic succotash. With grudging apology to folks who like the anemic kind.

I am not a succotash purist.  Anemic stuff.  Corn and lima beans swimming in some white stuff.  Weee.  Nope, give me some depth of flavor; a little bite; a little meatiness from some tomatoes.  And creamy white stuff turns into a splash or two of heavy cream.  This is a wonderful fresh meal, born of the farmers’ market here.  One stand was selling shelled peas–I’m not sure what kind; there was no label.  If you know, please let me know.  Otherwise, I’m going with Field Peas.

Anyone recognize these pea guys?

Anyone recognize these pea guys?

Another stand had some lovely white corn.  Yes, please.  The rest fell into place.

PMAT Succotash

  • fresh Field Peas (or limas or pinto beans or whatever).  I think my cryo-vacced bag weighed a pound
  • three ears corn (more or less, depending on how much you Like Corn)
  • olive oil and butter
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • diced onion, to taste
  • pepper flake, to taste
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken stock (only use if you’re using fresh peas/beans that need to be cooked.  If your beans are pre-cooked, you won’t need the stock)
  • 1 large can diced tomatoes (or about 2 cups worth of fresh tomatoes, peeled, seeded and diced)
  • any herbs you have lying about–fresh or dried
  • maybe 1/4 cup heavy cream

As you can see from Ye Olde Ingredient Liste, this is a pretty simple preparation.  You can add some meat to it to make it a little heartier.  You can serve it as a side.  You can season it however you like.  I think the Official Definition of succotash is something along the lines of a dish made from corn and beans.  The rest is up to you.  Here’s how I made ours:

Sweat onion in olie oil (okay, one of my letter keys isn’t working right now.  Guess which one.  How does this happen?  I blame the kittens.  From now on, an Apostrophe will play the part of That Letter). Anyway, with salt and pepper and pepper flake.  Until soft.

Butter hearts corn.  Corn hearts butter.  Why not let them both get what they want?

Butter hearts corn. Corn hearts butter. Why not let them both get what they want?

Cut kernels from the corn, thusly:

Step one: place ear firmly on upside down paper plate (or paper bowl)

Step one: place ear firmly on upside down paper plate (or paper bowl)

Slice kernels off with a sharp chef knife

Slice kernels off with a sharp chef knife

Scrape cob with back of knife to get all out all the pulp and milk

Scrape cob with back of knife to get all out all the pulp and milk

Toss the peas/beans into the pan with the onions.  Add the chicken stock and some herbs and simmer until mostly tender.  This took me about 30-ish minutes.

Once the peas/beans are mostly tender, add the tomatoes and corn.  Simmer to heat through.  Taste and adjust seasonings, adding salt/pepper/herbs as necessary until you like it.

Splash in the cream and reduce by about 1/3.  Taste again.  Because it’s good.

And that’s really it.  It’s easy to make; it’s cheap to make; it’s wide open to personal interpretation.  It contains Cream.  What’s not to like?

A Personal Anecdote Regarding Succotash
Last Thanksgi’ing, The Belo’ed and I went to see his aunt and uncle in Delaware.  I helped Auntie to make the meal.  Auntie is Not Used to being helped, and does things Her Way.  At any rate, my parts:  creamed cauliflower and stuffing.  She made succotash, and I made some extra beschamel for her, since I needed it for the cauliflower, too.  I asked if she wanted to put some tomato in her succotash.  You know, to mix things up a bit?  She was Scandalized.  “That’s not how I make it.  Uncle wouldn’t like it.”  I thought to myself he would if he tries it, but I was Meek and said okay.  Uncle piped up and asked how I make my succotash.  I ga’e him the run down, and he said that perhaps he would like it that way after all and maybe Auntie could do it that way Next Time.  She looked a bit Nonplussed, and e’en though I’m generally a Nice Person, I quietly enjoyed The Moment.

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Comments

  1. says

    As a child, I had no idea that the cartoon phrase thufferin’ thuccotash had anything to do with something you could eat. Still, I am better informed now, e’en though I ha’e ne’er had succotash (or at least nobody called it succotash, though I ha’e certainly eaten things with corn and beans that may ha’e resembled your lo’ely supper… which leads me to wonder if it tastes different when it’s got a different name?).

    Oh, and e’en though I am also a Nice Person, I quietly enjoyed your Moment too :)

    • says

      I can remember that an uncle from England came to ‘isit back in the 1970s. Mom was ser’ing corn. He turned up his nose and said that he didn’t eat corn. Apparently, it was strictly animal feed back in the 70s. Glad to hear there are Dishes Containing Corn in the 2000 in Ireland. :) And, according to my research, you can call any dish containing beanish things and corn “succotash,” so try it and see if it might taste different/better to you. :) Also, my number 1 doesn’t work on my keyboard, so I can’t make exclamation points. Otherwise, there would ha’e been one at the end of the last sentence.

      Thank you for that, DS–I appreciate your support of my Occasional Pettiness :lol:

  2. says

    Made succotash – or maybe it was just lady cream peas – with oyster-infused cream a few Thanksgi’ings ago. It was, as you can probably imagine, fantastic. Although I ha’e now learned that to be Succotash, it Must ha’e corn. Not a problem.

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